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The Economist

Jan 07 2023
Magazine

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The Economist

The world this week

Exit wave • How China’s reopening will disrupt the world economy

The end of magical thinking • Relations with Europe have caused a decade of turmoil in British politics. Here’s how to use the next ten years better

Northern delights • Why the gusty North Sea could give Europe an industrial edge

Internet from the sky • The success of Starlink in Ukraine has ignited a new space race

Unspeakable • What the Kevin McCarthy saga portends for America’s Congress

Letters

The satellites that saved Ukraine • The small dishes that link Ukrainian troops to Elon Musk’s low-flying satellites have made a big difference. The world’s armies are taking note

Making little plans • CHICAGOThe lessons the Windy City has for America

Business time • NEW YORKCan office blocks be converted into places to live?

The chaos Congress • WASHINGTON, DCRepublicans struggle even to elect a speaker of the House

Wealth warning • Pay transparency laws do not work as advertised

A silenced majority • Why is the country divided so evenly? What might change that?

Big plans, not much money • BRASÍLIALuiz Inácio Lula da Silva has to deal with a fiscal crunch and a fickle Congress

Reinventing the Indo-Pacific • SINGAPORE, TOKYO AND WASHINGTON, DCA new super-region is taking shape—mainly to counter Chinese aggression

Cloud coup-coup land • SUVA AND WELLINGTONA historic transfer of power in the South Pacific

An area of darkness • DELHIA country without self-knowledge cannot be well-governed

Be careful what you wish for • Pakistan and China are finding they have little leverage with the Taliban

The tsunami • DEZHOUChina’s medical system is overwhelmed by covid patients. Yet an even bigger wave may be coming

Avoiding a zero-covid reckoning • Like Chairman Mao, Xi Jinping seems to believe that China’s rise trumps individual suffering

Nothing’s gonna stop us now • DUBAIIsrael’s radical new government will test the country’s ties with Arab states

Hands off • DUBAIWomen are breaking sexual taboos in the Middle East

The heavy cost of the coup • GEDAREFThe troubled east is a microcosm of Sudan’s post-putsch crisis

Hills to die on? • KYIVRussia is bleeding, but reinforcing, in eastern Ukraine

On the scent • MALAUCÈNEThe competing ambitions of walkers and shooters

Frenemies on the Oder • BERLINThe two NATO allies can’t stop squabbling. Politics is to blame

The 6% club • Fifty years ago, the European Union began its enlargement. It is the secret of its current success

Careful assembly required • BRUSSELS, DURHAM AND LONDONThe components for a better relationship are there. Putting them together will not be easy

Questions of recognition • A Scottish law on transgender rights raises questions about devolution

Windrush • BRIGHTONBritain’s offshore wind farms draw visitors

The dark ages • Youth is wasted on the young. But wealth is wasted on the old

The arguments will persist • ROMEPope Benedict’s death removes a problem for liberal Catholics, but the church’s future is still clouded with doubt

Joy and severity • Joseph Ratzinger, later Pope Benedict XVI, died on December 31st, aged 95

Europe’s new powerhouse • ESBJERG AND WILHELMSHAVENCan the old continent’s most turbulent body of water give it a second wind?

New year, new you...


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Formats

OverDrive Magazine

Languages

English

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The Economist

The world this week

Exit wave • How China’s reopening will disrupt the world economy

The end of magical thinking • Relations with Europe have caused a decade of turmoil in British politics. Here’s how to use the next ten years better

Northern delights • Why the gusty North Sea could give Europe an industrial edge

Internet from the sky • The success of Starlink in Ukraine has ignited a new space race

Unspeakable • What the Kevin McCarthy saga portends for America’s Congress

Letters

The satellites that saved Ukraine • The small dishes that link Ukrainian troops to Elon Musk’s low-flying satellites have made a big difference. The world’s armies are taking note

Making little plans • CHICAGOThe lessons the Windy City has for America

Business time • NEW YORKCan office blocks be converted into places to live?

The chaos Congress • WASHINGTON, DCRepublicans struggle even to elect a speaker of the House

Wealth warning • Pay transparency laws do not work as advertised

A silenced majority • Why is the country divided so evenly? What might change that?

Big plans, not much money • BRASÍLIALuiz Inácio Lula da Silva has to deal with a fiscal crunch and a fickle Congress

Reinventing the Indo-Pacific • SINGAPORE, TOKYO AND WASHINGTON, DCA new super-region is taking shape—mainly to counter Chinese aggression

Cloud coup-coup land • SUVA AND WELLINGTONA historic transfer of power in the South Pacific

An area of darkness • DELHIA country without self-knowledge cannot be well-governed

Be careful what you wish for • Pakistan and China are finding they have little leverage with the Taliban

The tsunami • DEZHOUChina’s medical system is overwhelmed by covid patients. Yet an even bigger wave may be coming

Avoiding a zero-covid reckoning • Like Chairman Mao, Xi Jinping seems to believe that China’s rise trumps individual suffering

Nothing’s gonna stop us now • DUBAIIsrael’s radical new government will test the country’s ties with Arab states

Hands off • DUBAIWomen are breaking sexual taboos in the Middle East

The heavy cost of the coup • GEDAREFThe troubled east is a microcosm of Sudan’s post-putsch crisis

Hills to die on? • KYIVRussia is bleeding, but reinforcing, in eastern Ukraine

On the scent • MALAUCÈNEThe competing ambitions of walkers and shooters

Frenemies on the Oder • BERLINThe two NATO allies can’t stop squabbling. Politics is to blame

The 6% club • Fifty years ago, the European Union began its enlargement. It is the secret of its current success

Careful assembly required • BRUSSELS, DURHAM AND LONDONThe components for a better relationship are there. Putting them together will not be easy

Questions of recognition • A Scottish law on transgender rights raises questions about devolution

Windrush • BRIGHTONBritain’s offshore wind farms draw visitors

The dark ages • Youth is wasted on the young. But wealth is wasted on the old

The arguments will persist • ROMEPope Benedict’s death removes a problem for liberal Catholics, but the church’s future is still clouded with doubt

Joy and severity • Joseph Ratzinger, later Pope Benedict XVI, died on December 31st, aged 95

Europe’s new powerhouse • ESBJERG AND WILHELMSHAVENCan the old continent’s most turbulent body of water give it a second wind?

New year, new you...


Expand title description text